CURRENT MAGAZINE:

lloyd snow we are sand springs
We were able to sit down with Sand Springs Public School’s Superintendent, Lloyd Snow, and talk about some of the issues he is most passionate about. Lloyd Snow is in his last year as Superintendent and will be retiring at the end of this upcoming school year. He has been a champion for public education when it benefits the students and community.
It has been a little over a year since we were last able to sit down with Superintendent Lloyd Snow, so we asked him what had changed during that time for him and for Sand Springs Schools. “We have passed quite a few bond issues since I began as Superintendent in Sand Springs; the latest one enabling us to begin construction on Garfield Elementary and give a much needed makeover to the oldest school building in Sand Springs,” Snow shared. The construction was approved in the June 9th Bond elections, with part of the money going towards the renovations at Garfield and the other part going to replacing worn down buses for the 45 routes in Sand Springs. “The 91 (percent) vote truly shows the commitment of the community to the public education system”, Snow shared.
Looking forward to his last year, Snow expressed his goals for the upcoming year, “First we need for parents to be involved.” Lloyd Snow is extremely passionate about parental involvement in the school system. “PTA has come out strong this year and I think that’s a very good thing, but there is so much more parents can do.” He urges all parents to get involved not only at the school level but also the state level. “Parents need to be writing their State Representatives if they don’t agree with the choices they make,” stated Snow, “if we don’t say anything then shame on us.” He also wants to focus on getting the Garfield project completed before his retirement. Giving schools in Sand Springs the facilities and teachers they need for students to learn best is quite possibly his biggest legacy to the Sand Springs community.
Snow also expressed some concerns for the Sand Springs schools, “I don’t like a 3rd grader crying because he has to take a test. … We test them hard 34 weeks out of the year and the last two weeks everyone is too tired to do anything else.” At this point he asked me, “how many high stakes testing did you take in school when you were growing up?” Snow is immensely concerned about the testing taking place in schools. We asked if this was a residual effect from Common Core or a completely separate issue, “This dates back to No Child Left Behind which implemented standardized testing on all schools regardless of the target demographic for the original plan which was poor urban schools like Chicago and DC.” This type of testing suggested that all children would be rated on the same scale, nationwide. In theory this might be a good idea but as Snow suggests, the implementation was utterly flawed. “You can’t reduce a student to a single number…” states Snow, pointing back to the over testing of children.
As this is Lloyd Snow’s last year, we wanted to see what his plans were for retirement. “Spending more time with my wife and grandkids is a big priority, but I have had a lot of people ask me if I will be running for an elected office. I’m not going to say no to the idea but there is a lot to accomplish in the education arena.” We wish Lloyd Snow the best in his last year as Superintendent and in his retirement with whatever it holds.